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I am an employer

Creating a diverse workforce makes good business sense.  We know diverse teams add value, bring new ideas and perspectives and have a positive effect on profitability.

Employing people with disability boosts staff morale, increases customer loyalty and delivers a diverse workforce that reflects the community and your customers.

Hear how other businesses are putting this into practice.

Hiring people with disability

People with disability can bring a diverse range of new skills and talents to your organisation.

It’s easier to employ someone with disability than you think and there is government funding and support available to assist you.

Recruitment procedures can create barriers for people with disability.  By making some adjustments you can assist people with disability to apply and benefit other candidates as well.

Finding job seekers with disability

When advertising

  • Focus on the essential requirements of the position
  • Include a statement that you welcome applicants who have disability
  • Make sure all documents are accessible
  • Use plain English and avoid jargon

When interviewing

  • Include people with diverse perspectives on your interview panel
  • Provide flexibility for interviews. For example, this might include offering a phone interview, an alternative venue or inviting a supporter to accompany the candidate
  • Provide alternative tasks to written tests and be flexible with the way applicants present their information
  • If someone tells you about their disability before the interview, ask them if they need any adjustments
  • Don’t make assumptions about a candidate’s needs and ability

Inherent requirements are those requirements, tasks or skills that are essential to the job.  In position descriptions and job advertisements it is important to focus on what needs to be done, rather than the way things are done.

For instance, a law firm  advertising to fill a Solicitor position:

A job ad focusing on the inherent requirements might include:

“The ability to produce high quality advice and support within tight deadlines”

A job ad NOT focusing on the inherent requirements might include:

“Ability to type 60 wpm”

Creating an inclusive and accessible workplace

Making changes and adjustments

Being a disability confident workplace means creating a culture of inclusion and removing barriers for people with disability.

If you employ a person with disability, it’s important to make any reasonable adjustments or changes to ensure they can perform their job well.

Reasonable adjustments can be easier than you expect and involve minimal cost or even be cost neutral.   The Australian Government’s Employment Assistance Fund provides funding for workplace adjustments.

Consider asking:

“Are there any changes or adjustments to work practices or equipment we can make to assist you to do this job or be more productive?”

Making workplace adjustments enables you to confidently recruit, retain and support people with disability within your organisation.

Getting more support and information

JobAccess is the national hub for workplace and employment information for people with disability, employers and service providers.

Assistance with the cost of making workplace adjustments is available through the Australian Government funded Employment Assistance Fund.

A number of organisations, such as  Australian Network on Disability programs can provide further information and support.

JobAccess has information regarding your rights and responsibilities in the workplace.

Training available

Free training seminars are provided by the National Disability Recruitment Coordinator for employers to learn about creating job opportunities for people with disability and accessing services and financial support.

See the Possibilities Resources